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atomic:index [2020-01-27 10:25]
Friedrich Aumayr
atomic:index [2020-02-16 07:01] (current)
Friedrich Aumayr
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In this work, published by [[http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms13948|Nature Communications]], we demonstrate that graphene, a two-dimensional form of carbon, is able to provide tens of electrons for charge neutralization of a slow highly charged ion within a few femtoseconds only. This in turn results in extremely high current densities, which the graphene can withstand without suffering permanent damage. In this work, published by [[http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms13948|Nature Communications]], we demonstrate that graphene, a two-dimensional form of carbon, is able to provide tens of electrons for charge neutralization of a slow highly charged ion within a few femtoseconds only. This in turn results in extremely high current densities, which the graphene can withstand without suffering permanent damage.
- [[https://www.tuwien.at/en/research/news/news/graphene-able-to-transport-huge-currents-on-the-nano-scale/|Read more]].+ [[https://www.tuwien.at/en/tu-wien/news/news-articles/news/graphene-able-to-transport-huge-currents-on-the-nano-scale-1/|Read more]].
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A clean, eco-friendly and virtually inexhaustible source of energy: using nuclear fusion to produce electricity has been the dream of countless scientists for many years. However, until recently it has not been possible to construct a fusion reactor robust enough to withstand the enormous heat flux in the fusion plasma. To investigate this problem, a unique measuring device has been developed at the Institute of Applied Physics at TU Wien: One of the world’s most accurate scales. A clean, eco-friendly and virtually inexhaustible source of energy: using nuclear fusion to produce electricity has been the dream of countless scientists for many years. However, until recently it has not been possible to construct a fusion reactor robust enough to withstand the enormous heat flux in the fusion plasma. To investigate this problem, a unique measuring device has been developed at the Institute of Applied Physics at TU Wien: One of the world’s most accurate scales.
-[[https://www.tuwien.at/en/research/news/news/high-precision-experiments-to-determine-the-future-of-the-worlds-energy/|Read more]].+[[https://www.tuwien.at/en/tu-wien/news/news-articles/news/high-precision-experiments-to-determine-the-future-of-the-worlds-energy-1/|Read more]].
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atomic/index.txt · Last modified: 2020-02-16 07:01 by Friedrich Aumayr